Reality vs. Porn

by Lucas Witherspoon

It’s been argued that in the age of high-speed access to pornography via the Internet, an insatiable desire to take sex to new extremes or mimic pornographic scenarios has in turn taught us to be tolerant of what would have once been considered radical sexual behavior. Norman Doidge, a noted Canadian psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, has even suggested that pornography has, in essence, surpassed our inherent evolutionary biology when it comes to the way our brain sexually progresses, instead pointing to what he calls an “acquired taste” that we’ve been embedded with because of porn. It’s an interesting notion, but what it seems as though Doidge doesn’t take into consideration is that social factors, in addition to biological factors, also very plainly have an enormous effect on the way our brain develops. The concept of “innate bisexuality,” a term coined by Freud, is perchance the best example of this given the subject at hand. Essentially, Freud theorized that every human being is born of a bisexual nature, and that due to environmental and social influences, humans either adopt or keep dormant that bisexuality to varying degrees. This school of thought was also espoused by Alfred Kinsey in his later research.

As it pertains to pornography, it’s unfair to accuse porn of causing us to surpass our natural biological progression without also considering the fact that it may just be that we’re hard-wired with these sexual ideas that porn introduces us to, but because of the unfortunate taboo that still prevails with sex, we’ve been taught to keep these thoughts hidden or inert.

The bottom line is that porn doesn’t set the standard for what “normal” or “healthy” sex should be, nor is it intended to. At its core, porn is entertainment. In the same manner that owning a firearm doesn’t make you Jason Bourne, having a penis doesn’t make you James Deen; in either instance, there’s a presumption that rational people will be able to differentiate between fantasy and reality. But because porn is synonymous with sex, suddenly it’s a beacon for all things immoral: murder, rape, sexual assault, pedophilia, bestiality, etc., though no significant or direct correlation between pornography and these things has ever been proven.

Pornography is a job. At any job, those who are most qualified are going to be chosen to perform that job, which is why you’re is more likely to see men with nine-inch penises and well-toned bodies in porn instead of men with protruding guts and dicks that rival a Vienna sausage. Consider the statistics:

  • The average male penis in the U.S. is between five and seven inches. The average pornstar’s penis is between six and nine inches.
  • On average, 65 percent of women and 85 of men have natural pubic hair.
  • Normal people take 10 to 12 minutes to become fully aroused.
  • 75 percent of men ejaculate within three minutes.
  • Only 22 percent of women say they would agree to have their face ejaculated on, while only 30 percent say they would swallow.

What’s more, a lot of times porn scenes are not shot consecutively, so when people are finding that their sexual encounters are lasting only a few minutes instead of half an hour, it’s not that they’re sexually deficient, but rather that porn scenes are usually shot over several takes and seamlessly spliced together to create the illusion of continuity. Add to that the makeup, professional lighting, and perfect positioning of bodies, and what’s left is a product that is generally-speaking a far cry from what real sex usually is.

So, while it’s true that porn may inspire you and your partner to potentially try something new and adventurous sexually, realistically it is not meant to be a how-to guide, just as watching an episode of House is not intended to show you how to treat someone for porphyria.

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